Projects

  • Knitting Math: Calculating Cast on Stitches

    Please check out the companion video to this blog post!

    I was planning a rectangular shawl project called Mini Bubbles but I wanted to make it wider and knit it horizontally, rather than vertically. Fortunately, someone had already knit the same shawl using the same yarn and was kind enough to include enough information that I was able to use for my calculations.

    The other knitter cast on 123 stitches and her finished measurement was 31" wide.  I wanted

    These are some of the bubbles that I have opened.

    my shawl to be closer to 54 inches wide. This is a shawl that will be heavily blocked so I knew there is a little wiggle room on the width.

    First I needed to determine her gauge, or stitches per inch. The standby, of course, is to knit a gauge swatch. But for a shawl where measurements don't need to be exact, I am using the existing project's stitches per inch information.

    Stitches per Inch Formula: Total # of Stitches/Total # Inches = # Stitches per Inch

    She cast on 123 stitches and the finished project was 31" wide.  Using the formula, I calculated the following: 123 stitches/31 inches = 3.97 stitches per inch

    Total Stitches Needed Formula: Stitches per Inch X Desired Inched = Total Stitches Needed

    I want my shawl to be about 54 inches wide so I needed to use this next formula and figure out how many stitches are needed: 54 Inches X 3.97 Stitches per Inch = 214.38 Stitches

    Knowing that I need to round the number to the nearest whole number (I won't be casting on .38 stitches) and the pattern for the shawl has a certain number of stitches, I needed to do some more math!

    My pattern repeat is a Multiple of 15 plus a fixed number of 18 stitches. The 18 stitches is only counted one time but the rest of the stitches need to be divisible by 15. For example: 15 + 18 = 33 30 + 18 = 48 45 + 18 = 63 ? + 18 = 214.38* We need to figure out how many multiples of 15 are needed. * We will drop the .38 because we rounded down.

    Refined Total Stitches Formula: Total Number of Stitches - Fixed Number of Stitches = ?/15 = Approximate Multiplier

    214 - 18 = 196 196/15 = 13.06*

    Final Total Stitches Formula: Multiplier x Pattern Repeat Multiple = Pattern Repeat Number of Stitches Pattern Repeat Number of Stitches + Fixed Number of Stitches = Final Total Number Stitches

    Now we can determine that 13 x 15 = 195 + 18 = 213 Stitches.

    Quick Check Formula: # of stitches to cast on /# stitches per inch = Should Equal Original measurement goal

    To do a quick check, let's divide 213 by our original Stitches Per Inch Calculation. We should Get something close to 54 inches, my original goal.

    213 / 3.97 = 53.65

    Looks great!

     

  • A Little Gift: Earbud Pocket

    A few years ago I saw a pattern for an earbud pouch and knew I needed to make it. In my house with one teenager and one almost teenager, they are essential. My husband and I also use them a lot. This is perfect for a quick gift, something that can be used and a stash buster!

    This is the first I made with minor mods.

    I made the Earbud Pouch by Mary Keenan. In the last few weeks the link to the pattern changed to Unavailable but it is actually still out there (you can find it on my project page, as of now the link works). The only mod I made was to cast on bottom up instead of from the cuff. I had a limited bit of yarn and wanted to make sure I wouldn’t run out.

    After using the pouch for a bit, I realized I wanted to make some tweaks. I wanted it to be a tiny bit roomier and bottom of the pouch to be wider but still have a gentle curve for aesthetics.

    A side by side comparison, original on the left, modified on the right.

    Here is the end result. It takes very little yarn and knits up quickly! I used fingering weight yarn but really any yarn would work. I suspect I will be making this again with worsted or DK and will report back, of course. That might need some stitch number changes. If you haven’t tried the Turkish Cast On, this is a great time to learn something new! If you mess up you haven’t lost much since the project is small. Unless of course you are scrambling to get final gift knitting done, stick with what you know. I haven’t decided if I prefer it to Judy’s Magic Cast on but I find it easier to remember.

    Earbud Pocket

    You can see the slight difference in shape.

    It's about 3" wide and 2 3/4" tall.

    You need about 6 grams or 20 yards of fingering weight yarn. Size US1 or US1.5 circular needles

    Setup: Using magic loop* and Judy’s Magic Cast On OR the Turkish Cast On, cast on 44 stitches (22 on each needle).

    Increase Rounds: Round 1: K Round 2: K1, M1R, K to 1 stitch on needle, M1L, K1. Repeat on second needle. Repeat rounds 1 and 2 three times total until 56 stitches are on the needles.

    Knit every round for 1 inch.

    Decrease rounds: Round 1: K1, SSK, K to 3 stitches on the needle, K2tog, K1. Repeat on second needle. Round 2: K Repeat rounds 1 and 2 four times total until 40 stitches are on the needles.

    Cuff and Bind Off: Every round: K2, P2 across needle ending on K2. Repeat on second needle. Repeat for a total of 6 rounds. Bind Off using suspended bind off in pattern (meaning knit each knit stitch and purl each purl stitch). Weave in ends.

    *If you prefer to use DPNs instead of magic loop, divide the stitches across 4 DPN needles (11 on each at cast on) and use a marker for beginning of round. End of Needle refers to the end of the 2nd needle.

    The modified pocket!

    I hope that you will enjoy this little pattern! I didn’t  test this pattern so if you need help or clarification in any way, please let me know. It may be that I need to tweak the directions and others will benefit too.

    One final comment, I first heard about this pattern on the One Twisted Tree blog, written by Danie, which I remembered but not the details.  I went back and looked at that post after writing this and realized that, without intention, my mods and "pattern" were extremely similar to those that Danie made! So, hats off to the original designer and a thank you to Danie for planting the seed. Great minds think alike!

    Knit and Rock on!

  • Detour: Pouf Making

    Spoiler Alert! Finished Pouf!

    Are you ever plodding along, happy with your current projects and then all of a sudden you are taking a detour?

    I mentioned previously that my desk is a little tall and I am a little short and I need something underneath to rest my feet on. Otherwise they dangle like I am a 4 year old.

    I decided to crochet a pouf with some acrylic that I have in my stash. Most of this is Knitpicks Brava but some of it is Berocco Comfort. I have enough in colors that go nicely together and that match my office, that I decided to make something stripey.

    Crochet is not my thing. I enjoy it but I also have to work harder at it. I am not as comfortable with crochet as I am with knitting. But… I do have a sense of adventure and am willing to figure things out. After searching for crochet pouf patterns on ravelry, I kept coming up empty handed. They were either too big or too tall. I liked the look of this one but I was looking for more control in the size while knowing that with my limited crochet experience, I wasn’t going to be heavily modifying any patterns. I also didn’t want to purchase any yarn and everything I have is worsted. After all my searching, I decided to crochet 2 circles, one each for the top and bottom, and one strip that would form the walls of the pouf. I exclusively used double crochet (DC) except for joining when I used single crochet.

    First circle done!

    Craftsy has a blog with a “crochet a flat circle” tutorial which was very helpful. I used this for the top and bottom and since I wanted to use DC, I started with 12 stitches.

    Now, towards the bottom of this tutorial, they show examples of things that can do wrong, like the wavy potato chip circle. That’s what mine did. I didn’t care though. I assumed that once I seamed and stuffed my pouf, it will “block” right out. No one has ever regretted that path of thought, right? My stitch count was 100% on track so I suspect my gauge is just off enough to give me the waves.

    I used several other tutorials to help me with this project. The Magic Ring, Neat Join for closing a round and adding a new color after a neat join (standing double crochet).

    Soooo close to finishing.

    When all the strip was almost finished, I used locking stitch markers to evenly attach it to the top and bottom circles. I needed to crochet a few more rows and when finished I joined the top and bottom circles to the strip. I wish I had taken more pictures at this point but I was DONE and ready to move on.

    The other side!

    After I finished seaming, I started stuffing. I had some shredded memory foam on hand and quite a bit of it. A while back, Scott and I got new pillows and they were too stuffed so I had opened the seam and removed some stuffing. I used all of that and then some polyfill. Once it was stuffed enough, I used single crochet to join the ends of the strip together.

    I actually really love how this turned out. It is really cute, functional and I found everything I needed around the house.

    Lessons Learned (there are always lessons, right?):

    In use!

    Should’ve lined it. There are little bits of shredded foam peeking out. I did consider getting an old pillowcase and stuffing that inside and then stuffing the case but I thought “Nah!”. I might have benefitted from going down a hook size to make the fabric a little more dense but it doesn’t bother me. Projects are never as fast in the real world as I think they will be. I must be delusional because I tell myself, oh, I’ll just whip that right out, it won’t take but a few days, a week tops! Will I ever learn? Stick around to find out.

    Overall, I’m going to call it a win! What do you think? Do you ever totally abandon the plans you have and veer of course for a detour?

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